Mother’s Day, an essential tribute

Mother’s Day, an essential tribute

Culture

Cubaplus

It is no secret to anyone that the most important person in the life of every human being is the mother, who welcomes us in her womb for 9 months without protesting, despite the discomforts of the gestational state, raises us, educates us, she spends sleepless nights when we are sick and, in conclusion, she is the person who always watches over us until the time of her death. It is perhaps because of this condition that everyone celebrates one day each year in their honor, although perhaps, many may think that this celebration should be held every day of the year to honor the sacrifice and unconditional self-denial that mothers profess to their children. The first Mother's Day celebrations, according to historians, date back to ancient Greece, where Rea, the mother of the gods Zeus, Poseidon and Hades, was honored. Later, the Romans named this tribute Hilaria, after acquiring it from the Greeks. At that time, every March 15 was celebrated in the Cibeles temple and the offerings lasted three days. With the arrival of Christianity, these tributes were transformed to honor the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, and were held on December 8, when the Feast of the Immaculate Conception is honored, a date that Catholics adopted for the celebration of  Mother’s Day. In contemporary times, the origin of this celebration dates back to the year 1865, when the poet and activist Julia Ward Howe organized peaceful demonstrations and religious celebrations in Boston, where mothers of families who were victims of the Civil War participated.  She proposed establishing a special day as a way to reconcile the warring parties. Around the same time, Ann Jarvis, a Virginia activist, seeing the success of these Howe calls, also organizes meetings, in which the mothers met to exchange opinions on different current issues. Mother's Day meetings continued on a regular basis for the next several years, as Howe continued to work for women's rights and for peace. On May 12, 1905 Ann Jarvis dies, her daughter Anna to commemorate her loss every year organized a Mother's Day on the second Sunday of May. In 1907 Jarvis began an active campaign for the date to have official recognition and spread to the entire territory of the United States, based on Howe's demand. Jarvis began writing to influential personalities of the time to support her petition, and finally achieved official recognition in 1914, with the signature of President Woodrow Wilson, who officially recognized Mother's Day on the second Sunday in May.